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dc.contributor.authorWeatherford, John Golden
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:17:41Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:17:41Z
dc.date.issued2009-05
dc.identifier.otherweatherford_john_g_200905_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/weatherford_john_g_200905_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25701
dc.description.abstractThe Professor’s House (1925), My Mortal Enemy (1927), and Death Comes for the Archbishop (1928), three of Willa Cather’s most important works, collectively comprise Cather’s transition from Romantic Aestheticism to Aesthetic Christianity. Though critics have set forth many competing readings of the three works, none have considered them as a cohesive unit of Cather’s output. By examining together these three disparate-seeming works, one can observe and better understand the intimate and deep, though not initially obvious, connections that unify this period of Cather’s career.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAestheticism
dc.subjectCatholicism
dc.subjectChristianity
dc.subjectDeath Comes for the Archbishop
dc.subjectMy Mortal Enemy
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectRomanticism
dc.subjectThe Professor’s House
dc.subjectWilla Cather
dc.titleFrom romantic aestheticism to aesthetic Christianity
dc.title.alternativeWilla Cather's The professor's house, My mortal enemy, and Death comes for the archbishop
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorHubert McAlexander, Jr.
dc.description.committeeHubert McAlexander, Jr.
dc.description.committeeHugh Ruppersberg
dc.description.committeeJonathan Evans


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