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dc.contributor.authorStringfield, Barbara Smith
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:17:21Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:17:21Z
dc.date.issued2009-05
dc.identifier.otherstringfield_barbara_s_200905_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/stringfield_barbara_s_200905_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25671
dc.description.abstractThis study focuses on ethnic conflict and the management of that conflict through the use of electoral institutions, tools that are believed to be the most agreeable to design or reform. There is a relatively broad consensus that the use of the proportional representation electoral method (PR) is preferable over the majoritarian form in deeply divided societies. In spite of the ability of the theoretical arguments made on behalf of PR, why does ethnic conflict continue in systems in which it is used? Second, does PR have the same effect on conflict between ethnic groups as it does on rebellion? Through a large-N analysis using logistic regression I find that PR does reduce conflict between groups relative to majoritarianism, but the statistical strength of its effect is modest, suggesting a further need for study of this phenomenon.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectelectoral system
dc.subjectethnic conflict
dc.subjectproportional representation
dc.subjectmajoritarian
dc.titlePolitical problems and political solutions
dc.title.alternativeelectoral systems and ethnic conflict
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentPolitical Science
dc.description.majorPolitical Science
dc.description.advisorMarkus Crepaz
dc.description.committeeMarkus Crepaz
dc.description.committeeRyan Bakker
dc.description.committeeChristopher Allen


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