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dc.contributor.authorStorey, Linn M.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T16:22:27Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T16:22:27Z
dc.date.issued2008-12
dc.identifier.otherstorey_linn_m_200812_edd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/storey_linn_m_200812_edd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25322
dc.description.abstractScreening processes for nursing program admission are necessary to best utilize the limited faculty and facility resources and ensure that the maximum number of students will proceed to graduation and licensure. The nursing shortage has been highly publicized, attracting more applicants to nursing programs. However, the shortage affects the number of qualified faculty members as well, and many existing experienced faculty members are nearing retirement age. Selecting the criteria for program admission is important but remains controversial; objective versus subjective requirements raises many concerns. This study examines the value of individual student interview scores when used alone and when used in combination with objective criteria to predict the success of associate degree nursing students. The correlation of COMPASS scores, prerequisite course grade point averages, National League of Nursing Pre-nursing Exam percentile scores and interview scores are evaluated by their correlation to the nursing course grade point average at the time of program completion. Multiple linear regression analysis and logistic regression analysis are used on a sample of 209 students accepted into an associate degree nursing program over a 5 year period at a technical college in Georgia. The impact of gender and the probability of program completion regardless of nursing course grade point average are also examined. The results indicate a composite model that includes NLN Pre-nursing Exam scores and prerequisite course grades to be the best predictors of success based on the nursing course grade point average. The probability of program completion without regard to nursing grade point averages indicates the reverse of the main study; interview scores and COMPASS scores seem to be significant indicators of program completion. Gender shows no significant correlation to nursing grade point average or to program completion.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectNursing program admission
dc.subjectSelective admission for nursing programs
dc.subjectInterviewing nursing program applicants
dc.subjectPredicting nursing student outcomes
dc.titleThe effect of structured interviews on predicting the success of associate degree nursing students
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreeEdD
dc.description.departmentInstitute of Higher Education
dc.description.majorHigher Education
dc.description.advisorLibby V. Morris
dc.description.committeeLibby V. Morris
dc.description.committeeDenise Gardner
dc.description.committeeBrad Courtney
dc.description.committeeJ. Douglas Toma


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