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dc.contributor.authorLi, Weiling
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T16:21:32Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T16:21:32Z
dc.date.issued2008-12
dc.identifier.otherli_weiling_200812_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/li_weiling_200812_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25234
dc.description.abstractThis study was conducted using a nationally representative sample of Non-native English Speaking (NNES) students to estimate effects of certain student, family, and school variables on the science achievement of NNES Students. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to estimate effects of parental, school, and student variables on these NNES students’ science achievements. The estimate three level growth models included variables associated with student background characteristics (i.e., race, gender, and socioeconomic status); the school (i.e., school science instruction emphasis, number of certified ESL teachers); family (i.e., number of book at home, language spoken at home); and students (i.e., time spent on science homework, ESL enrollment). Responses to questions from a large, nationally representative dataset, the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988, were employed to test the model. It is found that from base year to the second follow-up, NNES students’ science achievement increased as students progressed in grade level. More home literature, more parental involvement and better home environment are good predictors of NNES students’ science achievement and achievement growth. Background and socioeconomic status (SES) affect NNES students’ achievement, but these variables only partially explain the level of science achievement attained. Proper parents’ guidance and school efforts would aid in closing the achievement gap.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectNon-native English Speaking students
dc.subjectScience Education
dc.subjectHierarchical Linear Modeling
dc.titleScience achievement of non-native English speakers
dc.title.alternativea longitudinal, hierarchical linear modeling perspective
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentMathematics and Science Education
dc.description.majorScience Education
dc.description.advisorMary Atwater
dc.description.committeeMary Atwater
dc.description.committeeLinda Harklau
dc.description.committeeSeock-Ho Kim
dc.description.committeeGregory Palardy


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