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dc.contributor.authorGöransson, Johannes
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T16:21:00Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T16:21:00Z
dc.date.issued2008-12
dc.identifier.othergoransson_johannes_k_200812_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/goransson_johannes_k_200812_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25186
dc.description.abstractIn the critical preface to this pageant, I develop a theory of the grotesque that brings together Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s concept of “minor literature” with Lennard J. Davis’s idea of the disabled body. I argue that the grotesque mode is a way to undermine the majoritarian demand for a stable language and the state’s demand for an illusory whole, able body. The grotesque text discomforts because it reveals the lie of normal bodies and normal language. The pageant itself collapses the language and imagery of imperialism into the world of the American suburb. The threatening outsider is shown to be a fantasy essential to maintaining the heterosexual, xenophobic American idyll of suburbia. The language is exaggerated and interpenetrated by foreign languages. The leading characters of this grotesque resistance are The Passenger, an immigrant, and Miss World, a molested child. Both of them display a radical artificiality both in terms of actions and language.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectGrotesque
dc.subjectpageants
dc.subjectviolence.
dc.titleEntrance to a colonial exhibition in which we all begin to intricate
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorJed Rasula
dc.description.committeeJed Rasula
dc.description.committeeAndrew Zawacki
dc.description.committeeRonald Bogue


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