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dc.contributor.authorBracewell, Amy Brooke
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T16:20:28Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T16:20:28Z
dc.date.issued2008-12
dc.identifier.otherbracewell_amy_b_200812_mhp
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/bracewell_amy_b_200812_mhp
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25137
dc.description.abstractThe United States has presented a biased representation of American Indian history since the formation of the country. By understanding the complex evolution of historic perspectives, we gain a better understanding of how to remedy the situation and create a more balanced presentation of history. This thesis will analyze past Euro-American perceptions of American Indians and how this point of view has affected the interpretation of American Indian history at historic sites and museums. Through examining past and present presentations of the American Indian, this thesis will identify several tools that historic sites can use to break away from biased and outdated notions of America’s history.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAmerican Indian
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectCanada
dc.subjectInterpretation
dc.subjectHistoric preservation
dc.subjectHistory
dc.titleTelling their own story
dc.title.alternativethe presentation of American Indian history reconsidered
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMHP
dc.description.departmentSchool of Environmental Design
dc.description.majorHistoric Preservation
dc.description.advisorWayde Brown
dc.description.committeeWayde Brown
dc.description.committeeJ. Anthony Paredes
dc.description.committeeR. Alfred Vick
dc.description.committeeJames Reap


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