Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVerhine, Eric Christian
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T16:19:49Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T16:19:49Z
dc.date.issued2008-08
dc.identifier.otherverhine_eric_c_200808_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/verhine_eric_c_200808_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25078
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the problem of why two of Cicero’s later philosophical works on the topic of religion, De Natura Deorum and De Divinatione, subject the topic to much greater skepticism than had his earlier works, De Republica and De Legibus, in which he had only touched on the topic. After surveying and rejecting a number of theories previously set forth to account for this apparent shift in Cicero’s philosophic perspective, this study proceeds to establish the agonistic literary context in which Cicero was writing as a backdrop against which it is possible to discern his intentions for De Natura Deorum and De Divinatione. The study concludes that Cicero’s aim in these works is to construct religion as a discourse that reveals the shortcomings of Epicureanism and Stoicism and that justifies his own philosophical school, Academic skepticism.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectCicero
dc.subjectskepticism
dc.subjectdialogue
dc.subjectcontext
dc.subjectEpicureanism
dc.subjectStoicism
dc.subjecteristic
dc.titleThe victorious wisdom of Simonides
dc.title.alternativeCicero's justification of academic skepticism in De natura deorum and De divinatione
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentClassics
dc.description.majorClassical Languages
dc.description.advisorRobert Curtis
dc.description.committeeRobert Curtis
dc.description.committeeErika Hermanowicz
dc.description.committeeKeith Dix


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record