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dc.contributor.authorRush, Katie Louise
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T16:19:23Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T16:19:23Z
dc.date.issued2008-08
dc.identifier.otherrush_katie_l_200808_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rush_katie_l_200808_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25041
dc.description.abstractOne of the main rhetorical tasks of Dorothy Day, co-founder of the Catholic Worker movement, was to establish her authority. In this study, I address this rhetorical challenge by analyzing two pieces of Day’s rhetoric—The Catholic Worker newspaper and Day’s autobiography The Long Loneliness. I argue that Day drew on the resources of the newspaper and autobiographical genres to establish her authority and, moreover, that she exercised her authority in two contrasting ways. In some instances, she assumed the role of the prophet, criticizing her community from a distance. In other instances, she located herself firmly within her community, drawing on rhetorical traditions to build identification with her audience. The tension between these two rhetorical styles, the prophetic and the personal, is a central characteristic of Day’s rhetoric.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectDorothy Day
dc.subjectCatholic Worker Movement
dc.subjectAuthority
dc.subjectRhetoric
dc.subjectIdentification
dc.subjectProphetic Voice
dc.subjectRhetorical Traditions
dc.titleDorothy Day and the matter of authority
dc.title.alternativea rhetorical analysis
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentSpeech Communication
dc.description.majorSpeech Communication
dc.description.advisorJohn M. Murphy
dc.description.committeeJohn M. Murphy
dc.description.committeeThomas M. Lessl
dc.description.committeeKelly Happe


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