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dc.contributor.authorNorris, Laurie
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T03:27:54Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T03:27:54Z
dc.date.issued2008-08
dc.identifier.othernorris_laurie_g_200808_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/norris_laurie_g_200808_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25012
dc.description.abstractThrough Donna Haraway's Cyborg Manifesto (re-cycled through Mikhail Bakhtin's heteroglossic tongues and the French Feminists' rhetoric of laughter), I discuss ways that the cyborg metaphor proves apt as a means of re-defining self and resisting being self-ed, directing my gaze toward the works of Chuck Palahniuk, specifically Fight Club and Invisible Monsters. Palahniuk offers those of us dissatisfied with our consumerist, materialist cultures a way out of our objectifying social coding. His ways are fraught with peril and danger, but they are also liberatory. By reading his novels through the critical filter of Haraway's metaphor, we can experience the adaptability and resistant potential of the cyborg.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectChuck Palahniuk
dc.subjectDonna Haraway
dc.subjectMikhail Bakhtin
dc.subjectFight Club
dc.subjectInvisible Monsters
dc.subjectCyborg Theory
dc.subjectIdentity
dc.subjectPerpetual Present
dc.subjectLaughter
dc.subjectResistance
dc.title"Find what you're afraid of most and go live there"
dc.title.alternativethe cyborg metaphor and Chuck Palahniuk's Fight club and Invisible monsters
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorMichael Moran
dc.description.committeeMichael Moran
dc.description.committeeMichelle Ballif
dc.description.committeeChristy Desmet


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