Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLuttrell, Rosemary K.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T03:27:17Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T03:27:17Z
dc.date.issued2008-08
dc.identifier.otherluttrell_rosemary_200808_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/luttrell_rosemary_200808_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24984
dc.description.abstractUsing Richard Lanham's concept of a substance and style continuum and of the economics of attention, this thesis explores Henry James's tendency to collapse the continuum in his novels of the 1880's. The chapters explore James's treatment of invention and style in The Portrait of a Lady, The Bostonians, and The Princess Casamassima, revealing James's tendency to dramatize moments of liberation for those of his characters who are able to pay attention, at the same time, to both substance and style.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectHenry James
dc.subjectAestheticism
dc.subjectinvention
dc.subjectstyle
dc.subjectRichard Lanham
dc.titleHenry James's reinvention of style
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorKristin Boudreau
dc.description.committeeKristin Boudreau
dc.description.committeeRichard Menke
dc.description.committeeChristy Desmet


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record