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dc.contributor.authorHawley, Todd S.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T03:25:54Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T03:25:54Z
dc.date.issued2008-08
dc.identifier.otherhawley_todd_200808_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hawley_todd_200808_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24910
dc.description.abstractThis study addresses a gap between recommendations and research regarding the development of purposeful rationales in social studies teacher education programs and the practices of first-year teachers. Adding to the literature on rationale-based, purposeful practice, this research relied on a multiple-case study methodology to examine how three first-year teachers used rationales developed in their preservice teacher education program as first-year teachers. Three specific research questions were developed to guide the study: 1) How do first-year social studies teachers draw upon their developing teaching rationales to guide their content and/or pedagogical decision-making? 2) What factors help or constrain new teachers as they enact rationale-based practices in social studies classrooms? 3) How do new social studies teachers continue to develop their rationales throughout their first year of professional practice? Three teachers were selected as participants after completing a social studies teacher education program which stressed rationale development. Two of the participants were graduates of the undergraduate program and one was a graduate of the master’s with initial certification program. Data were collected through interviews scheduled with participants throughout the school year and following frequent observations of their teaching. School personnel responsible for working with the participants were interviewed to understand the expectations placed on the participants by their schools and to examine the types of support provided to each participant as a new teacher. Field notes taken during classroom observations and documents collected throughout the study helped provide a nuanced description of the participants’ experiences. Three themes developed during data analysis. The themes were: 1) teacher versus “the system;” 2) the rationale meets reality; and 3) built-in guilt. The themes show that rationale-based practice is possible across multiple contexts, by teachers taking divergent paths to becoming social studies teachers and who taught different social studies courses. Data analysis highlights a gap between the ideas in the participants’ rationales and their practice as new teachers. To address this gap, social studies teacher education programs need to develop a coherent pedagogy of rationale-based practice designed to better prepare new teachers to put their rationales into practice.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectRationale-based Practice
dc.subjectSocial Studies Teacher Education
dc.subjectFirst-Year Teachers.
dc.titlePurpose into practice
dc.title.alternativethe problems and possibilities of rationale-based practice in social studies
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentElementary Education and Social Studies Ed
dc.description.majorElementary Education
dc.description.advisorTodd Dinkelman
dc.description.committeeTodd Dinkelman
dc.description.committeeJames Marshall
dc.description.committeeRonald Butchart


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