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dc.contributor.authorGraybeal, Geoffrey Michael
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T03:25:42Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T03:25:42Z
dc.date.issued2008-08
dc.identifier.othergraybeal_geoffrey_m_200808_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/graybeal_geoffrey_m_200808_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24899
dc.description.abstractFor almost three decades, newspapers have tried varying efforts to lure young readers to their products with mixed results. The Internet and technological advances have children and young people turning to alternative, often digital forms of media for their news and information. This theoretically-driven, nationwide survey of U.S. daily newspaper publishers examines what efforts newspapers have taken to attract young readers. The Resource-Based View of strategic management and financial commitment models were used as the basis for the study. Findings reveal that newspapers have invested few resources to youth content, that the Internet has become the top strategic priority for publishers targeting youth, and that a few newspapers have been able to successfully grow readership, and make a profit off youth products.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectResources
dc.subjectYouth
dc.subjectYoung
dc.subjectRBV
dc.subjectFinancial Commitment
dc.subjectNews
dc.subjectNewspapers
dc.subjectTeens
dc.subjectChildren
dc.subjectSurvey
dc.subjectStudy
dc.titleYouth 2.0
dc.title.alternativea study of resources used by newspapers to attract young readers
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentJournalism and Mass Communication
dc.description.majorJournalism and Mass Communication
dc.description.advisorHugh J. Martin
dc.description.committeeHugh J. Martin
dc.description.committeeAlison Alexander
dc.description.committeeC. Ann Hollifield


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