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dc.contributor.authorBest, John
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T03:24:23Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T03:24:23Z
dc.date.issued2008-08
dc.identifier.otherbest_john_r_200808_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/best_john_r_200808_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24829
dc.description.abstractThere is growing support for the notion that aerobic exercise selectively benefits executive functions (EF). Although several physiological mechanisms have been proposed, the hypothesis that aerobic exercise benefits children’s executive functioning via changes in strategic behavior has not been tested. The focus of this study was to reexamine for possible mediation by strategy use data (Davis et al., 2007; under review) that demonstrated that aerobic exercise selectively benefited EF. The results revealed differences in strategy use across the treatment levels but provided no evidence that strategy use mediated the relation between aerobic exercise and improved EF. However, the results did provide valuable information regarding developmental trends in strategic behavior on a standardized measure of EF. Also, strategy use was related to greater accuracy but not to decreased completion time on all EF tasks.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectExecutive Functioning
dc.subjectAerobic Exercise
dc.subjectStrategy Use
dc.subjectCognition
dc.titleChildren's strategic behavior on a measure of executive functioning
dc.title.alternativedevelopmental trends and relations to aerobic exercise
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorPatricia H. Miller
dc.description.committeePatricia H. Miller
dc.description.committeeMartha Carr
dc.description.committeePhillip Tomporowski


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