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dc.contributor.authorStrang, Sarah Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T03:23:06Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T03:23:06Z
dc.date.issued2008-05
dc.identifier.otherstrang_sarah_e_200805_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/strang_sarah_e_200805_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24767
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to empirically investigate Machiavellianism and narcissism as antecedents of ethical leadership and leader effectiveness; in addition the role of ethical context in these relationships is examined. Although no significant effects are found for Machiavellianism, significant effects are found for narcissism when moderated by ethical context on both leader effectiveness and ethical leadership. Findings suggest that the negative direct effect of narcissism may become more salient in an ethical context; on the other hand, perceptions of the effectiveness and ethical leadership of narcissistic leaders may actually be improved in the presence of an unethical context. Implications for both researchers and practitioners are discussed.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectEthics
dc.subjectLeadership
dc.subjectEffectiveness
dc.subjectOrganization
dc.subjectEthical Context
dc.subjectMachiavellianism
dc.subjectNarcissism
dc.titleEthical leadership and leader effectiveness
dc.title.alternativethe roles of Machiavellianism, narcissism, and ethical context
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorKarl Kuhnert
dc.description.committeeKarl Kuhnert
dc.description.committeeWendy Ruona
dc.description.committeeBrian Hoffman
dc.description.committeeW. Keith Campbell
dc.description.committeeW. Keith Campbell


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