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dc.contributor.authorRhamey, Jon Patrick
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T03:22:31Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T03:22:31Z
dc.date.issued2008-05
dc.identifier.otherrhamey_jon_p_200805_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rhamey_jon_p_200805_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24737
dc.description.abstractThe role of domestic economic activity as a motivator toward state conflict has long assumed a secondary position to the more tangible instruments of state power. Domestic manipulations of the money supply have rarely been discussed in conjunction with interstate behavior. The purpose of this paper is to bridge the gap between inflation and aggression. First, this paper will lay the theoretical framework connecting changes in the money supply to a state’s propensity to initiate hostility. Secondly will follow a discussion of the mechanisms by which a state engages in this behavior. Finally, data collected from a thirty year period in the twentieth century will be tested to determine the explanatory power of inflation on the likelihood of a state to initiate conflict.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectInternational Conflict
dc.subjectInflation
dc.subjectMonetary Policy
dc.subjectDemocratic Peace
dc.subjectDiversionary War
dc.subjectCurrency
dc.subjectCurrency Union
dc.subjectBretton Woods
dc.titlePrinting conflict
dc.title.alternativeinflationary monetary policy and the likelihood of war
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentPolitical Science
dc.description.majorPolitical Science
dc.description.advisorMaurits van der Veen
dc.description.committeeMaurits van der Veen
dc.description.committeeBrock Tessman
dc.description.committeeDamon Cann


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