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dc.contributor.authorPlayer, Tiffany Angel
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T03:22:21Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T03:22:21Z
dc.date.issued2008-05
dc.identifier.otherplayer_tiffany_a_200805_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/player_tiffany_a_200805_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24729
dc.description.abstractIn June 1922, the Anti-Lynching Crusaders created a mass social movement, led by black women, to eradicate lynching. Over the course of six months, ALC leaders, under the auspices of the NAACP, mobilized a network of experienced club and church women to harness the anger and vulnerability of the black community into a viable reform endeavor, to influence the moral consciousness of white Americans and to secure passage of the Dyer Anti-Lynching Bill. Led by veteran clubwoman, Mary Burnett Talbert, members used prayers, newspaper ads, and community gatherings to compel its biracial audiences to broaden their view of lynching from a regional race problem to an issue of national import. They also pledged to raise one million dollars and mobilize one million supporters. The ALC used religious and moralistic language to refute any rationale for race violence. Their efforts succeeded in broadening the base of anti-lynching supporters.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAnti-Lynching Crusaders
dc.subjectBlack women's reform
dc.subjectAnti-Lynching reform
dc.subjectNAACP
dc.subjectDyer Anti-Lynching Bill
dc.subjectMary B. Talbert
dc.titleThe anti-lynching crusaders
dc.title.alternativea study of black women's activism
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.description.majorHistory
dc.description.advisorDiane Batts Morrow
dc.description.committeeDiane Batts Morrow
dc.description.committeeJohn Inscoe
dc.description.committeeKathleen Clark


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