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dc.contributor.authorMcDaniel, Dustin
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T03:21:43Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T03:21:43Z
dc.date.issued2008-05
dc.identifier.othermcdaniel_dustin_w_200805_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/mcdaniel_dustin_w_200805_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24697
dc.description.abstractMidterm elections in the United States are often seen as less important than presidential elections. This is evidenced by their lower turnout and the relative inattentiveness of the media. That the president campaigns is a well-known fact, but few scholars have sought to understand the strategy undertaken by the president in determining where to visit and where to stay away. In this thesis I propose that the president develops and implements a cohesive strategy for campaigning for or against incumbent Congressmen and Senators in midterm elections. First, the president takes into account the party of the incumbent, the office of the incumbent, and the contextual differences of the election year. Factors such as the competitiveness of the race, the president’s popularity, and the incumbent’s support of the president all influence the way the president makes his midterm campaign decisions.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectmidterm elections
dc.subjectpresidential visits
dc.subjectcampaign strategy
dc.subjectGeorge W. Bush
dc.subject2002
dc.subject2006
dc.titlePresidential midterm campaign strategy and campaign visits
dc.title.alternativethe case of 2002 and 2006
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentPolitical Science
dc.description.majorPolitical Science
dc.description.advisorPaul-Henri Gurian
dc.description.committeePaul-Henri Gurian
dc.description.committeeJamie Carson
dc.description.committeeDamon Cann


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