Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLane, Megan
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T03:21:18Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T03:21:18Z
dc.date.issued2008-05
dc.identifier.otherlane_megan_e_200805_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/lane_megan_e_200805_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24672
dc.description.abstractThis paper will serve as a largely historical examination of the practice and history of American folk religion, in particular that of Hoodoo Conjure. It will be, in many ways, a reflection of the existing study of the practice, while seeking to establish the importance of folk religion in American as well as world culture. Folk religions are perhaps those that exist in every culture, thus this paper will provide a description of the American incarnation of one. The religious and cultural background of Hoodoo Conjure will be described, as well as its practice during the colonial and antebellum periods of the United States to the present day.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectHoodoo
dc.subjectConjure
dc.subjectSlavery
dc.subjectFolk Religion
dc.subjectCunning Folk
dc.subjectRoot Work
dc.subjectCharms
dc.subjectMagic
dc.titleHoodoo heritage
dc.title.alternativea brief history of American folk religion
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentReligion
dc.description.majorReligion
dc.description.advisorSandy Dwayne Martin
dc.description.committeeSandy Dwayne Martin
dc.description.committeeJace Weaver
dc.description.committeeCarolyn Jones Medine


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record