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dc.contributor.authorHardgrove, Abby Virginia
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T03:20:09Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T03:20:09Z
dc.date.issued2008-05
dc.identifier.otherhardgrove_abby_v_200805_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hardgrove_abby_v_200805_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24629
dc.description.abstractFamily rituals and routines are practiced by Liberian refugees in order to reestablish their family lives in the context of a refugee camp. With two focus groups and 20 interviews conducted with Liberian refugee mothers and female caregivers in the summer of 2007, daily routines of these women represented their concern for food acquisition and children’s education. Their rituals reflected a persistent reliance on their Christian faith. The results of this study illuminate some of the family processes of long term refugees, and point to the meanings they attribute to their family’s present circumstances. Their resilience is seen in their persistence in the face of overwhelming odds.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectLiberians
dc.subjectRefugee
dc.subjectFamily Resilience
dc.subjectFamily Rituals and Routines
dc.titleThe remains of the day
dc.title.alternativefamily resilience in Liberian refugee families living in Ghana
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentChild and Family Development
dc.description.majorChild and Family Development
dc.description.advisorLynda Henley Walters
dc.description.committeeLynda Henley Walters
dc.description.committeeDenise Clark Lewis
dc.description.committeePatricia Bell-Scott


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