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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Judith
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T03:18:45Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T03:18:45Z
dc.date.issued2008-05
dc.identifier.otherbrown_judith_b_200805_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/brown_judith_b_200805_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24562
dc.description.abstractThe research examines the amount of influence and the relationship between the legal and PR departments during the three stages of crises: pre-crisis, crisis and post-crisis evaluation. The research shows that practitioners do not follow the exact model of gaining influence outlined by the power relations theory. Practitioners use individual influence resources to gain influence instead of relational influence resources. The research finds that public relations practitioners do have a significant amount of influence, yet their influence did depend largely on the specific crisis situation. More often than not, crisis management is not handled entirely by legal or PR, but rather it is a collaborative effort.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectCrisis
dc.subjectPublic Relations Practitioners and Lawyers
dc.subjectCrisis Management
dc.subjectPower relations theory
dc.titleApplying power relations theory to understand the relationship between public relations practitioners and in-house counsel during a crisis
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentJournalism and Mass Communication
dc.description.majorJournalism and Mass Communication
dc.description.advisorBryan Reber
dc.description.committeeBryan Reber
dc.description.committeeWendy Macias
dc.description.committeeLynne Sallot


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