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dc.contributor.authorAyers, Karl
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T03:18:25Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T03:18:25Z
dc.date.issued2008-05
dc.identifier.otherayers_karl_w_200805_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/ayers_karl_w_200805_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24546
dc.description.abstractThe Roman historian Livy, when writing his account of the siege of Veii, embellished many of the details with epic language and tone. By examining similarities with other epics and by contrary archaeological evidence, Livy’s narrative can be shown to be a misrepresentation of the scale and importance of the actual siege. Instead, Livy’s portrayal of events presents readers with an ulterior motive as can be seen in the actions of the main character of Book V, Camillus. The exaggerated account surrounding the siege of Veii lifts Camillus, as a character, into the realm of the epic and legendary heroes of Rome’s past. In doing so, Camillus, an historical character that carries ancient values, becomes a perfect exemplum for right and moral action in the eyes of Livy’s readers.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectLivy
dc.subjectVeii
dc.subjectCamillus
dc.subjectRoman historiography
dc.titleLivy, Veii, and Rome
dc.title.alternativeAb urbe condita, Book V
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentClassics
dc.description.majorClassical Languages
dc.description.advisorJames Anderson
dc.description.committeeJames Anderson
dc.description.committeeErika Hermanowicz
dc.description.committeeRobert Curtis


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