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dc.contributor.authorAtangcho, Pius
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T03:18:22Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T03:18:22Z
dc.date.issued2008-05
dc.identifier.otheratangcho_pius_m_200805_llm
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/atangcho_pius_m_200805_llm
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24543
dc.description.abstractThe quest for self-determination through secession is activated by various groups in the contemporary scene guided by claims of speaking a certain language, having similar values and having a unique historical past. There is a growing support for human rights and its extension to the right to self-determination as a principle in International law. States on the other hand justify their opposition by arguing for the primacy of territorial integrity. The International system’s position shows a basic nation-state bias aimed at safeguarding and maintaining international boundaries and for international peace and security. Federalism is seen as a viable solution to secessionist threats by accommodating the divergent aspirations of multi-cultural federal subunits by promoting some degree of autonomous self-government.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectHuman Rights - Freedom - Democracy - Secession Self-determination - International law - States Federalism - International system - Ethnicity - Multiculturalism - Disintegration - Discontent - Territorial integrity
dc.titleQuest for self-determination through secession in Cameroon
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeLLM
dc.description.departmentLaw
dc.description.majorLaw
dc.description.advisorGabriel Wilner
dc.description.committeeGabriel Wilner
dc.description.committeeCharles O'Kelley


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