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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, T. Lee
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:53:22Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:53:22Z
dc.date.issued2007-12
dc.identifier.otherwilliams_lee_200712_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/williams_lee_200712_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24526
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of my study was to address the research question: What is the relationship between reading aloud and the emergent literacy of kindergarten students? My goal was to empirically evaluate the often-cited claim that reading aloud to young children is “the signal most important activity for developing knowledge required for eventual success in reading” (Anderson, Hiebert, Scott, & Wilkinson, 1985). I examined a pre-existing read-aloud intervention program designed by a school media specialist, in collaboration with the kindergarten teachers, as a way to promote kindergarten students’ exposure to books, appreciation for reading, and development of early literacy knowledge and skills. Participants included 46 kindergarten students in a suburban public school. The students represented a mix of gender, race, and abilities. Although reading aloud is one of the most discussed topics among early childhood literacy researchers, I was motivated to conduct this study by the large, but somewhat ambiguous research on the outcomes of read alouds. I believed there was an opportunity to help teachers, parents, and media specialists better understand the potential benefits of reading aloud to young children as well as one specific intervention designed to support this practice. There were three key ways that my study sought to uniquely contribute to the literature: (a) by employing a more precise measure of read-aloud frequency,(b) by evaluating the possibility of a threshold effect for the number of books read aloud to children, and (c) by expanding a broader dependent measure to tap both cognitive and affective dimensions of emergent literacy. The findings from both the quantitative and descriptive data collected as part of my study offered important insight into my research question.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectReading aloud
dc.subjectemergent literacy
dc.subjectreading interventions
dc.subjecthome-school reading
dc.titleRe-examining the intuitive
dc.title.alternativereading aloud and kindergarteners' emergent literacy
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentLanguage and Literacy Education
dc.description.majorReading Education
dc.description.advisorJames F. Baumann
dc.description.committeeJames F. Baumann
dc.description.committeeDonna E. Alvermann
dc.description.committeeLinda D. Labbo


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