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dc.contributor.authorSash, Kimberly Jo
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:52:23Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:52:23Z
dc.date.issued2007-12
dc.identifier.othersash_kimberly_j_200712_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/sash_kimberly_j_200712_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24484
dc.description.abstractLongleaf pine forests of the southeast were once one of the most extensive ecosystems in North America. Snakes are one component of this system for which we have a limited understanding. I used radio telemetry and trapping on 2 sites to better understand community ecology, habitat use, and classify habitat requirements. I radio-tagged 2 sympatric species, corn and gray rat snakes. Partitioning of habitat did exist, corn snakes prefer upland habitat and gray rat snakes prefer bottomland habitat. I documented captures of 1,802 individuals representing 19 different species from 2003-2005. Intact upland sites are necessary to many snakes including some threatened species. Intact upland is best managed with prescribed burning and is necessary to provide open pine forest snake species with proper habitat.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectGray rat snake
dc.subjectEastern rat snake
dc.subjectcorn snake
dc.subjecthabitat use
dc.subjectsnake community structure
dc.subjectRed Hills
dc.subjectElaphe
dc.subjectPantherophis
dc.subjectRadio telemetry
dc.subjecttrapping
dc.subjectlongleaf pine ecosystem
dc.titleSnake ecology of the Red Hills region of south Georgia and north Florida
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentForest Resources
dc.description.majorForest Resources
dc.description.advisorJohn P. Carroll
dc.description.committeeJohn P. Carroll
dc.description.committeeSteven B. Castleberry
dc.description.committeeWilliam E. Palmer


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