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dc.contributor.authorRich, Peter Jacob
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:52:12Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:52:12Z
dc.date.issued2007-12
dc.identifier.otherrich_peter_j_200712_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rich_peter_j_200712_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24477
dc.description.abstractInstructional decision making, claimed to be the basic or most important teaching skill, has been the subject of much research and debate, yielding decision-making models, expert/novice teacher thinking comparisons and understandings of teacher judgment, among a multitude of other insights. Yet, as important a skill as instructional decision-making was thought to be, most studies failed to account for practical utility, doing little to actually shape the way teachers learn and practice their skill. Recent developments in video annotation tools, however, have made the process of systematically recording oneÕs own teaching and analyzing instructional decisions available to practitioners. These tools have made possible the collection and analysis of video and other evidence related to specific teaching performances. Video annotation tools provide alternative approaches to analyzing instructional decisions at a time when state and federal agencies are clamoring for increased evidence of teacher quality. This dissertation is a compilation of journal-ready manuscripts written with the intent of furthering the understanding that can be gained from using the Video Analysis Tool to help preservice teachers analyze, assess, and adapt their own practices. The first article is a theoretical framework and review of the literature available on the use of video annotation tools in teacher education. The second article is a case study of 3 preservice teachersÕ first experience in using the video analysis tool during a 4-week internship experience. The third article, also a case study, examines the experience of 4 preservice teachers from the same cohort during a later student teaching experience. Finally, the fourth article is a detailed analysis of the content of the student teachersÕ Video Analysis Tool comments. The purpose of these studies is to further understand how preservice teachers use evidence-based methods and tools to systematically progress toward professional instructional decisions in their planning, enactment and adaptations of these plans.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectpreservice teachers
dc.subjectstudent teachers
dc.subjectvideo analysis
dc.subjectinstructional decisions
dc.titleThe video analysis tool
dc.title.alternativeanalyzing, assessing and adapting preservice teachers' instructional decisions
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentEducational Psychology and Instructional Technology
dc.description.majorInstructional Technology
dc.description.advisorMichael J. Hannafin
dc.description.committeeMichael J. Hannafin
dc.description.committeeArthur Recesso
dc.description.committeeChandra Orrill
dc.description.committeeMartha Allexsaht-Snider


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