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dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Frank Ryan
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:51:57Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:51:57Z
dc.date.issued2007-12
dc.identifier.otherpeterson_frank_r_200712_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/peterson_frank_r_200712_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24465
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the relationship between sibling delinquency and respondent risky behavior of emerging adults. This study attempts to understand the influence a sibling has on deviant behavior, sexual permissiveness, and substance use. Sibling support and sibling contact were the two components of a sibling relationships that were examined. A social learning theory framework was used to organize the hypotheses and to discuss findings. It was hypothesized that an individual who has high contact and support from a deviant sibling would be more likely to engage in deviant behavior, be more sexually permissive, and have increased alcohol use. The sample was comprised of over 700 undergraduates enrolled in a large state university. A test of the mediating and moderating effects of sibling support and contact was conducted. Results indicate that there is a mediating effect and a moderating relationship between the influence of sibling delinquency and respondent deviance, sexual permissiveness, and alcohol use for females. This means that as contact and support with a delinquent sibling increases, the level of respondent deviance, sexual permissiveness, and alcohol use also increases.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectABSTRACT This study examines the relationship between sibling delinquency and respondent risky behavior of emerging adults. This study attempts to understand the influence a sibling has on deviant behavior
dc.subjectsexual permissiveness
dc.subjectand substance use. S
dc.titleThe effect of sibling delinquency on risky behaviors during emerging adulthood
dc.title.alternativean investigation of the mediating and moderating influences
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentChild and Family Development
dc.description.majorChild and Family Development
dc.description.advisorLeslie G. Simons
dc.description.committeeLeslie G. Simons
dc.description.committeeDavid Wright
dc.description.committeeGene Brody


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