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dc.contributor.authorMorrell, Geoff
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:51:36Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:51:36Z
dc.date.issued2007-12
dc.identifier.othermorrell_geoff_m_200712_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/morrell_geoff_m_200712_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24450
dc.description.abstractThe fact that T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land presents an ecologically and culturally destitute world would appear to make the poem an obvious focus of attention for ecocritics, especially given our current growing environmental problems. This has not been the case, however. I argue that by using the principles of ecology and biophilia, it becomes possible to read the structure of The Waste Land as being a voice in and of itself, a long neglected voice that speaks to the potential redemption of civilization through the recognition of the integral interconnectedness of all things. The structure of The Waste Land is a very intricate web of fragments that mimic the interconnections that form a healthy ecosystem. This structure is in direct contrast to the emptiness and desolation of the poem’s content, reflecting the effects that human conceit has on civilization when a civilization regards itself as being separate from the rest of the natural world.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectT. S. Eliot
dc.subjectThe Waste Land
dc.subjectecocriticism
dc.subjectbiophilia
dc.subjectpoetic structure
dc.subjectform
dc.titleLanguage of the non-speaking
dc.title.alternativestructure as biophilic voice and source of hope in T.S. Eliot’s The waste land
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorCarl Rapp
dc.description.committeeCarl Rapp
dc.description.committeeFran Teague
dc.description.committeeRichard Menke


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