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dc.contributor.authorKley, Saskia
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:51:05Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:51:05Z
dc.date.issued2007-12
dc.identifier.otherkley_saskia_200712_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/kley_saskia_200712_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24426
dc.description.abstractObesity is significant risk factor and strongly correlated with diabetes mellitus (DM) and insulin resistance in cats. The prevalence of feline obesity and feline DM has been drastically increased over the last two decades, and DM is one of the most common endocrinopathies in cats. However, their study has been hampered by the fact that thus far metabolism could not be evaluated easily in a non-invasive manner. However, without clear knowledge of disease processes, any treatment remains unfocused and non-specific. The purpose of this research was to study glucose metabolism and beta cell function and to determine possible dietary effects on glucose metabolism in lean and long-term obese cats. We used cutting-edge nuclear magnetic resonance technology in combination with indirect calorimetry to investigate key steps in glucose metabolism non-invasively and we developed a sensitive feline proinsulin (FPI) assay to evaluate the utility of proinsulin as a marker for beta cell function in lean and obese cats. Our results showed that cats are capable to adapt to different macronutrients and that dietary supplementation of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) appear to have some beneficial metabolic effects whereas the supplementation of saturated fatty acids (SATs) seem to be less beneficial for cats. In addition we demonstrated that endogenous glucose production (EGP) is strongly negatively correlated to insulin concentration and obesity. We developed and validated an immunoradiometric and Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay for feline proinsulin for the assessment of beta cell function and demonstrated significantly differences in the proinsulin and insulin secretion pattern in response to glucose between lean and obese cats but similar pattern within their group. This novel assay will be useful to elucidate FPI secretion and can be used in a similar manner as the C-peptide assay in humans to evaluate residual beta cell function in cats.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectObesity
dc.subjectcats
dc.subjectglucose metabolism
dc.subjectfat metabolism
dc.subjectdiabetes mellitus
dc.subjectproinsulin
dc.subjectinsulin
dc.subjectendogenous glucose production
dc.subjectgluconeogenesis
dc.subjectglycogenolysis
dc.titleNovel non-invasive methods to evaluate glucose metabolism and beta cell function in cats
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentPhysiology and Pharmacology
dc.description.majorPharmacology
dc.description.advisorMargarethe Hoenig
dc.description.committeeMargarethe Hoenig
dc.description.committeeJames H. Prestegard
dc.description.committeeDuncan C. Ferguson


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