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dc.contributor.authorFeeney, Mary Kathleen
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:50:24Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:50:24Z
dc.date.issued2007-12
dc.identifier.otherfeeney_mary_k_200712_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/feeney_mary_k_200712_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24395
dc.description.abstractDespite the largess of mentoring literature, there is little research investigating mentoring in the public and nonprofit sectors and even less research comparing mentoring in the two sectors. Mentoring programs have become increasingly popular in both sectors, making it more important to understand how mentoring affects career outcomes in each sector. This dissertation investigates two research questions related to mentoring outcomes in the public and nonprofit sectors. (1) Does mentoring affect protŽgŽ time spent at work and organizational involvement? (2) How do protŽgŽ time spent at work and organizational involvement vary by sector? By investigating these two research questions and focusing on protŽgŽ career outcomes and variation in mentoring outcomes, by sector, this research addresses two significant limitations of the current mentoring literature. First, this dissertation compares work behavior outcomes for mentored and nonmentored individuals. Second, it tests for sectoral differences in mentoring outcomes by first comparing a split sample of public and nonprofit sector employees and second, using multilevel modeling to isolate the relationships between individual-level and group-level factors that affect the career outcomes of mentoring. The results indicate that having had a mentor has a significant affect on the amount of time a protŽgŽ spends at work and the protŽgŽÕs organizational involvement. Second, the affect of mentoring on time spent at work and organizational involvement significantly varies by sector, producing larger effects for protŽgŽs in the nonprofit sector compared to public sector. Third, the results of the multilevel models indicate that, for mentored respondents, a larger proportion of the variance in time spent at work and organizational involvement is explained by the group level factors of organization age, size, and sector than the individual level factors of work motivation, job history, current job characteristics, mentorship type, and demographic characteristics.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectMentor
dc.subjectMentoring
dc.subjectPublic Sector
dc.subjectNonprofit sector
dc.subjectOrganizational Involvement
dc.subjectTime at work
dc.titleMentoring in the public and nonprofit sectors
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentPublic Administration and Policy
dc.description.majorPublic Administration
dc.description.advisorBarry Bozeman
dc.description.committeeBarry Bozeman
dc.description.committeeVicki Wilkins
dc.description.committeeKeely Jones
dc.description.committeeHal Rainey


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