Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWoo, Seong Min
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:48:54Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:48:54Z
dc.date.issued2007-08
dc.identifier.otherwoo_seong-min_200708_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/woo_seong-min_200708_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24325
dc.description.abstractElliottia racemosa, commonly called Georgia plume, is one of the rarest native plants in Georgia. Tissue culture protocols were developed for propagation and conservation. A series of studies evaluated disinfestation treatments, explant types and age, light condition, and plant growth regulators. Adventitious shoots were induced on a medium supplemented with 10 mu-M TDZ + 5 mu-M IAA, with transferred elongation of shoots after transfer to media containing 2iP. High rooting frequencies were obtained under in vitro and ex vitro conditions with over 85% survival of plantlets transferred to greenhouse conditions. Tissue culture appears to be a promising approach for the propagation and conservation of this rare and threatened plant. Morphological and histological evaluations of cultures during induction and development were conducted using light and scanning electron microscopy.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectElliottia racemosa
dc.subjectTDZ
dc.subject2iP
dc.subjectclonal propagation
dc.subjectconservation
dc.subjecthistology
dc.titleIn vitro propagation of Georgia plume, Elliottia racemosa, a threatened Georgia endemic
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentHorticulture
dc.description.majorHorticulture
dc.description.advisorHazel Y. Wetzstein
dc.description.committeeHazel Y. Wetzstein
dc.description.committeeJames M. Affolter
dc.description.committeeScott A. Merkle


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record