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dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Carrie Anne
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:46:33Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:46:33Z
dc.date.issued2007-08
dc.identifier.othermatthews_carrie_a_200708_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/matthews_carrie_a_200708_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24220
dc.description.abstractAfter the success of the Persian Wars and the development of Athenian nationalism the image of the barbarian changed. The word ba/rbaroj, a barbarian, was originally a label for a non-Greek speaker, but as a result of the Persian Wars this label took on negative qualities: cowardice, stupidity, and the inability to communicate. In the fifth century language was a defining characteristic, and the ability to speak Greek was exclusive; those who could speak Greek were participants in all facets of the Greek world, while those who could not were shut out. The same extends to comedy. In three plays Aristophanes represents the speech of barbarians, an activity unique to Greek literature. His predecessors do not represent barbarian speech either due to a different ideological perspective, or due to genre conventions. Aristophanes’ representation of barbarian language, then, offers an exclusive reflection of the new Athenian ideology.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAristophanes--Language
dc.subjectGreek Drama (Comedy)--History and Criticism
dc.subjectGreek language--Political Aspects--Greece
dc.subjectLanguage and Culture--Greece
dc.titleBarbarians and language in Aristophanes
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentClassics
dc.description.majorClassical Languages
dc.description.advisorCharles Platter
dc.description.committeeCharles Platter
dc.description.committeeT. Keith Dix
dc.description.committeeJared Klein


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