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dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Anthony Scott
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:44:14Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:44:14Z
dc.date.issued2007-08
dc.identifier.othercunningham_anthony_s_200708_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/cunningham_anthony_s_200708_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24118
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, I argue that the war on drugs" has increased Black STD risk by creating imbalanced sex ratios which has enabled men with tastes" for promiscuity to form risky sexual relationships. I test this hypothesis in several ways. First, I use data from the NLSY97 to examine the effect of mating options on promiscuity and condom use and use diverging sex ratios for Blacks in late adolescence to identify the effect of mating options on risky sexual behavior. I find that Black men at the 90th quantile - men I term "promiscuous" - will have between 1.3 and 2.4 more female sex partners a year due to changes in the sex ratio over the sample period. I also find evidence that Black men alter their condom use in response to the sex ratio. Separately, I test for a link between incarceration rates and STD outcomes. I find strong evidence that Black incarceration rates are associated with higher rates of gonorrhea and syphilis among Black females. I also have provided the first quantitative evidence that the crack epidemic increased gonorrhea and syphilis. Gonorrhea rates began falling in the mid-to-late 1980s as the prison population continued expanding. I argue that abortion legalization, waning crack and the AIDS epidemic are partly responsible for these changes. I exploit the natural experiment offered by early legalization of abortion five states in 1970, compared to universal legalization in 1973, to estimate the effect of abortion legalization on second generation gonorrhea rates. I find mixed evidence for the abortion legalization hypothesis, combined with consistently strong evidence that the crack epidemic and the AIDS epidemic contributed to the declines. Using a difference- in-difference-in-difference model, I find Black 15{19 year-old gonorrhea rates fell relative to 35{39 year-olds in repeal states compared to Roe legalization states. I also find that for every 100 deaths from AIDS, Black gonorrhea rates fell 7 cases per 100,000. The crack index consistently reveals strong positive correlations with gonorrhea rates for Blacks and Whites, but as the index is based on 3 proxies for crack, interpretation of the coefficients are difficult.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectHealth~Economics
dc.subjectLabor~Economics
dc.subjectApplied~Microeconomics
dc.subjectRisky~Sexual~Behavior
dc.subjectSex~Ratio
dc.subjectCrack~Cocaine
dc.subjectIncarceration
dc.subjectAbortion
dc.subjectSexually~Transmitted~Diseases
dc.subjectGonorrhea
dc.subjectSyphilis
dc.titleThree essays on the effect of incarceration, drug use and abortion legalization on STD risk
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentEconomics
dc.description.majorEconomics
dc.description.advisorChristopher M. Cornwell
dc.description.committeeChristopher M. Cornwell
dc.description.committeeRonald Warren
dc.description.committeeScott Atkinson
dc.description.committeeDavid Mustard


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