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dc.contributor.authorWest, Helen Knapp
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:35:39Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:35:39Z
dc.date.issued2007-05
dc.identifier.otherwest_helen_k_200705_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/west_helen_k_200705_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24032
dc.description.abstractIn Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell and Charlotte Brontë’s industrial novels, Mary Barton, North and South and Shirley, the female protagonists display increased agency as they move between the public and private sectors. The authors incorporate a critique of Christian institutions into their industrial texts, insisting that the church must not ignore the plight of women and the industrial poor. Inspired by her belief in Jem’s innocence, Mary Barton moves from the domestic realm and into a public courtroom. North and South focuses on the development of female influence. Shirley points to the possibility of a new, elevated place for women within a spiritual context. Reflecting the crises of the times in which they were written, these novels illustrate that the experience of crises instigates change, and that the crises facing industrial England called for transformation in terms of politics, religion and sexual roles.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectElizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell
dc.subjectCharlotte Bronte
dc.subjectMary Barton
dc.subjectNorth and South
dc.subjectShirley
dc.subjectindustrial novel
dc.subjectMargaret Hale
dc.subjectShirley Keeldar
dc.subjectCaroline Helston
dc.titleMary Barton, north and south, and Shirley: women and faith in industrial England
dc.title.alternativean examination of three novels by Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell and Charlotte bronte
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorRoxanne Eberle
dc.description.committeeRoxanne Eberle
dc.description.committeeRichard Menke
dc.description.committeeTricia Lootens


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