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dc.contributor.authorUlevich, Lisa Michelle
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:35:26Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:35:26Z
dc.date.issued2007-05
dc.identifier.otherulevich_lisa_m_200705_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/ulevich_lisa_m_200705_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/24020
dc.description.abstractThis study considers the history of laureateship and the relevance of laureate self-presentation on the poetry of Michael Drayton (in Idea) and George Gordon, Lord Byron (in Don Juan). I consider how these poets use the gestures of stable, centered laureate identity to legitimize their poetry, but rely upon strategies of unstable poetic voice and narrative progression to provoke engagement with their work. When conventions and formulae threaten to render the articulation of individual authority meaningless, Drayton and Byron both seek recourse to the advantages of rapidly unfolding variety, within the conceptual framework of self-styled stable poetic identity.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectlaureate
dc.subjectlaureateship
dc.subjectDrayton
dc.subjectsonnet
dc.subjectIdea
dc.subjectByron
dc.subjectDon Juan
dc.title"As thus to varietie inclin'd"
dc.title.alternativeDrayton, Byron, and laureateship
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorCoburn Freer
dc.description.committeeCoburn Freer
dc.description.committeeFrances Teague
dc.description.committeeAnne Mallory


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