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dc.contributor.authorShores, Kathryn E.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:34:53Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:34:53Z
dc.date.issued2007-05
dc.identifier.othershores_kathryn_e_200705_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/shores_kathryn_e_200705_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/23991
dc.description.abstractAn analysis of Cormac McCarthy’s prose style and the language of his characters in the representative Appalachian novels The Orchard Keeper, Child of God, and The Road demonstrate a tense double vision of hope and hopelessness. Consumer culture and bureaucracy are life-sapping in McCarthy’s work; however, communicative spoken words are restorative. Although in McCarthy’s most recent novel, he tells the story of a world in ruin, memory and story and beauty survive, despite the bleakness of the landscape. In McCarthy’s work, the words themselves and the language of his characters suggest the possibility of a world other than the dark one he dramatizes.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectCormac McCarthy
dc.subjectAppalachian novels
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectStorytelling
dc.subjectMemory
dc.subjectConsumer culture
dc.subjectBureaucracy
dc.subjectThe Road as Appalachian novel
dc.titleThe power of the word in Cormac Mccarthy's Appalachian novels
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorJames Everett Kibler
dc.description.committeeJames Everett Kibler
dc.description.committeeJonathan Evans
dc.description.committeeHugh Ruppersburg


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