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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Erin Rachelle
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:30:00Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:30:00Z
dc.date.issued2006-12
dc.identifier.otherwilliams_erin_r_200612_mhp
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/williams_erin_r_200612_mhp
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/23762
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this thesis is to attempt to answer the question of why a relationship exists between nineteenth century southern gardens and quilts. The research focuses on how the popularity of gardens and gardening among southern women in the nineteenth century, technological advancements in the textile and sewing industries, and the changing social attitudes towards in the nineteenth century united to promote creation of floral quilts during the nineteenth century. It is hoped that this research will prove helpful to those interested in both the history of gardening and quilting and will inspire these same people to preserve quilts, an American art form that tells us so much about our cultural history.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectQuilting
dc.subjectGardens
dc.subjectNineteenth century
dc.subjectSouthern states
dc.subjectPreservation
dc.subjectIntangible cultural resources
dc.titleA flowering of quilts
dc.title.alternativegarden patterns and floral motifs in nineteenth century Southern quilts
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMHP
dc.description.departmentHistoric Preservation
dc.description.majorHistoric Preservation
dc.description.advisorJohn C. Waters
dc.description.committeeJohn C. Waters
dc.description.committeeHolly Anderson
dc.description.committeeMary Anne Akers
dc.description.committeeJames R. Cothran


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