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dc.contributor.authorWenger, Seth J.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:29:54Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:29:54Z
dc.date.issued2006-12
dc.identifier.otherwenger_seth_j_200612_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wenger_seth_j_200612_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/23758
dc.description.abstractIncreasing urban land cover is a threat to many freshwater fish species. To effectively manage this threat we need to understand the nature of the stressors, develop relationships between stressors and measures of population viability, create a policy for limiting stressors and use predictive modeling to fine tune the policy and forecast the outcome of management. In this dissertation, I use the development of a Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) for the imperiled fish species of the Etowah River basin, Georgia, USA, as a case study in applying this kind of conservation approach. I review the literature on urban effects on fishes, concluding that stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces is most likely to be the major threat to imperiled species of the Etowah. I then develop models relating the presence/absence of five species to effective impervious area (EIA) after accounting for historic land use, hydrogeomorphic variables and the confounding factors of incomplete detection and spatial autocorrelation. For a species (the Cherokee darter, Etheostoma etowahae) that shows a relationship between EIA and abundance but not presence, I propose an extension of existing methods to simultaneously model species presence, abundance and detection. I then explain the policy we have developed under the Etowah HCP for limiting the total volume of runoff from developed sites. This policy has the potential to limit EIA to sufficiently low levels to permit species persistence in the Etowah while accommodating future growth. Finally, I illustrate how predictive modeling can be used to guide application of this policy and forecast the outcomes, even with limited data, and propose this as a general approach to managing for imperiled species threatened by land use change.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectFish
dc.subjectstreams
dc.subjectfreshwater
dc.subjecturban
dc.subjecturbanization
dc.subjectCherokee darter
dc.subjectEtowah darter
dc.subjectamber darter
dc.subjectpredictive modeling
dc.subjectstormwater runoff
dc.subjecteffective impervious area
dc.subjectimpervious cover
dc.subjectEIA
dc.subjectEtowah Habitat Conservation Plan
dc.subjectHCP
dc.subjectland use
dc.subjectpolicy
dc.subjectmanagement
dc.subjectE
dc.titlePredicting and preventing losses of imperiled fish species in an urbanizing environment
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentEcology
dc.description.majorEcology
dc.description.advisorMary C. Freeman
dc.description.committeeMary C. Freeman
dc.description.committeeJames T. Peterson
dc.description.committeeJudith L. Meyer
dc.description.committeeByron J. Freeman
dc.description.committeeLaurie A. Fowler


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