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dc.contributor.authorChapman, David Allen
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T02:26:13Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T02:26:13Z
dc.date.issued2006-12
dc.identifier.otherchapman_david_a_200612_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/chapman_david_a_200612_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/23602
dc.description.abstractThis thesis seeks to identify the personal forces that motivated the composition of the Karl Amadeus Hartmann’s Symphony no. 1, Versuch eines Requiems, and how these may inform an interpretation of the Symphony today. These issues include the influences that led to Hartmann’s unique style in the 1930s, the politics of the work’s would-be reception in the early years of the Nazi Regime, and the post-war changes in the composer’s own interpretation of the work. The final chapter proposes an interpretive reading of the work as a dramatic monologue by the Allmutter, personified by the alto singer, and who mourns the loss of “her sons, her daughters” in a great and oppressive “misery” - an obvious comment on the cruelty and destruction of the Third Reich. The untexted theme and variations movement is seen as a meaningful gesture of identification with those oppressed by the Regime.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectKarl Amadeus Hartmann
dc.subjectMusic History
dc.subjectWalt Whitman
dc.subjectModernism
dc.subjectSymphony
dc.subjectHermeneutics
dc.subjectGermany
dc.subjectNazism
dc.subjectMusic and Politics
dc.titleIch sitze und schaue aus
dc.title.alternativegenesis, evolution, and interpretation of K.A. Hartmann's first symphony
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentMusic
dc.description.majorMusic
dc.description.advisorDavid Haas
dc.description.committeeDavid Haas
dc.description.committeeDavid Schiller
dc.description.committeeJohn Turci-Escobar


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