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dc.contributor.authorBurchfield, Rebekah Lynn
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T01:03:21Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T01:03:21Z
dc.date.issued2006-05
dc.identifier.otherburchfield_rebekah_l_200605_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/burchfield_rebekah_l_200605_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/23073
dc.description.abstractThe recorded music industry flourished in the early twentieth century, a time whenAmerican culture was characterized by a new consumption ethic. Women were central to thenew consumer culture and thus became central to the success of the recorded music and radioindustries. This study examined 163 advertisements for phonographs, records, radios, and radioprogramming that appeared in the LadiesÕ Home Journal, the Saturday Evening Post, and theAmerican Magazine from 1905-1948. Using the theory of iconology, this study analyzedthematic portrayals of women and appeals to female consumers in the images and texts ofadvertisements. This study found that advertisements encouraged women to regard the regularpurchase of records and consumption of radio as vital to maintaining a happy home and personalwell-being.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectSound recording history
dc.subjectPhonograph
dc.subjectRadio history
dc.subjectWomen
dc.subjectConsumer culture
dc.subjectMagazines
dc.subjectEarly twentieth century
dc.subjectAdvertisements
dc.subjectMusic technology
dc.titleAdvertising and images of female interaction with early recorded music technology, 1905-1948
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentGrady College of Journalism and Mass Communication
dc.description.majorJournalism and Mass Communication
dc.description.advisorJanice Hume
dc.description.committeeJanice Hume
dc.description.committeeDwight Brooks
dc.description.committeeJay Hamilton


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