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dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Laura Nicole
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T23:28:22Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T23:28:22Z
dc.date.issued2005-12
dc.identifier.otherrichardson_laura_n_200512_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/richardson_laura_n_200512_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/22996
dc.description.abstractThis thesis takes a historical approach to examine the media coverage of landmark moments in disability history, both in the nineteenth century and during the beginning stages of the Disability Rights Movement in the twentieth century. The thesis illustrates how the media has been instrumental in helping the disability community gain a sense of identity within society, while at the same time reflecting longstanding disability stereotypes and hindering their acceptance. Although the terminology used in the articles improved significantly between the centuries, many of the stigmas that existed about the disability community remained. This study reveals the complexity of the media coverage of disability issues and the differences that arose in articles as coverage changed with each era.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectDisability
dc.subjectDisability Rights Movement
dc.subjectDisability Community
dc.subjectStereotypes
dc.titleMedia portrayal of people with disabilities and coverage of landmark moments in disability history
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentJournalism
dc.description.majorMass Communication
dc.description.advisorJanice Hume
dc.description.committeeJanice Hume
dc.description.committeeJenny Manders
dc.description.committeeKaren Russell


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