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dc.contributor.authorPetersen, Amy Nohr
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T23:28:14Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T23:28:14Z
dc.date.issued2005-12
dc.identifier.otherpetersen_amy_n_200512_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/petersen_amy_n_200512_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/22988
dc.description.abstractAugustus exiled Ovid to Tomis in AD 8 in part, the poet says, because of his carmen, the Ars Amatoria. Ovid presents the misfortunes of exile in two collections of elegiac epistles, the Tristia and Epistulae ex Ponto. As the recipient of nine epistles, Ovid’s wife is his most frequent addressee. Other poems throughout the two works also mention her. Ovid models the persona of his wife in the exile poetry on characters he developed in the Amores, Heroides, and Ars Amatoria. She appears initially as an abandoned heroine, then as a beloved from whom Ovid seeks fulfillment of his needs, and eventually becomes a pupil in imperial courtship. The resulting “conjugal love elegy” does not replace his earlier erotic elegy but recasts it as a means for Ovid to lament his misfortunes, present a new image for his poet-narrator, and immortalize his genius.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAugustus
dc.subjectConiunx
dc.subjectElegy
dc.subjectEpistolary Poetry
dc.subjectEpistulae
dc.subjectExile
dc.subjectLatin
dc.subjectLivia
dc.subjectOvid
dc.subjectOvid\'s wife
dc.subjectTristia
dc.titleOvid's wife in the "Tristia" and "Epistulae ex Ponto"
dc.title.alternativetransforming erotic elegy into conjugal elegy
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentClassical Languages
dc.description.majorLatin
dc.description.advisorT. Keith Dix
dc.description.committeeT. Keith Dix
dc.description.committeeNancy Felson
dc.description.committeeErika Hermanowicz


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