Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHarris, Paget
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T23:27:00Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T23:27:00Z
dc.date.issued2005-12
dc.identifier.otherharris_paget_w_200512_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/harris_paget_w_200512_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/22923
dc.description.abstractThe aesthete-decadent sensibility expressed in Charles Baudelaire’s Le Peintre de la vie moderne, J.-K. Huysmans’ A Rebours, and Rainer Maria Rilke’s The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge demonstrates a developing reaction to the changes affecting the social life and th - th- urban environments of 19and early 20century Paris. These texts represent different modes of the aesthete-decadent sensibility that correspond to the particular dialectic of individuality that is activated through each work’s treatment of artifice, memory, and sensory experience. The trajectory of these changes in sensibility is also determined by the effects of consumerism on the individual’s experience of urban life. In conclusion, a significant reconceptualization of the individual emerges through an analysis of how the relationship between art, life, and subjectivity are treated in each of the three works.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectDecadence
dc.subjectAestheticism
dc.subjectFin de siecle
dc.subjectBaudelaire
dc.subjectHuysmans
dc.subjectRilke
dc.subjectParis
dc.subject19th-century Industrialization
dc.subjectDialectic of Individuality
dc.subjectFlaneur
dc.subjectDecadent
dc.titleDialectic of individuality
dc.title.alternativemodes of the aesthete-decadent sensibility in Baudelaire, Huysmans, and Rilke
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentComparative Literature
dc.description.majorComparative Literature
dc.description.advisorRonald Bogue
dc.description.committeeRonald Bogue
dc.description.committeeBeatrice Hanssen
dc.description.committeeThomas Cerbu


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record