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dc.contributor.authorEllisor, Sarah Paige
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T23:21:23Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T23:21:23Z
dc.date.issued2005-08
dc.identifier.otherellisor_sarah_p_200508_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/ellisor_sarah_p_200508_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/22639
dc.description.abstractI argue that Cassandra (1860) by Florence Nightingale is a seminal text in the canon of nineteenth-century women writers. I examine the influences upon Nightingale that shaped the creation of this radical essay: the muscular Christianity movement of mid-Victorian England, Romanticism, her religious beliefs, and Charlotte Brontë’s novel Shirley (1849). These forces of influence blend to form a revolutionary essay—both in message and form—that argues for the release of women from the shackles of enforced idleness. Cassandra’s influence upon later female writers, namely Ray Strachey and Virginia Woolf, is evident in the relationships between Cassandra and Strachey’s The Cause and Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own. Noting the interrelationships of influence surrounding this essay, I maintain that Cassandra must be recognized as an integral text in studying the evolution of women’s writing.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subject_Cassandra_
dc.subjectFlorence Nightingale
dc.subjectWomen\'s roles
dc.subjectMuscular Christianity
dc.subjectFragment
dc.subject_Shirley_
dc.subject_The Cause_
dc.subject_A Room of One\'s Own_
dc.titleFlorence Nightingale's Cassandra
dc.title.alternativethe prophet's predecessors and descendants
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorRoxanne Eberle
dc.description.committeeRoxanne Eberle
dc.description.committeeTricia Lootens
dc.description.committeeAnne Mallory


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