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dc.contributor.authorBeasley, Elizabeth Webster
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T23:20:10Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T23:20:10Z
dc.date.issued2005-08
dc.identifier.otherbeasley_elizabeth_w_200508_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/beasley_elizabeth_w_200508_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/22579
dc.description.abstractThe introduction explores issues of obsession, diction, argument, abstraction, and the via negativa in poetry. The essay defends the notion of the generic lyric, as practiced by Rilke, Dickinson, and Plath, and argues that, while part of the tradition of the Romantics and the Imagists, the contemporary generic lyric is able to reinvent itself in surprising and compelling ways. How the Brain Grew Back Its Own History consists of short, image-driven lyrics whose central theme is the body. The collection uses the cellular process of death and regeneration to tell a kind of creation story.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectGeneric lyric
dc.subjectLyrics
dc.subjectAbstraction
dc.subjectVia negativa
dc.subjectRilke
dc.subjectDickinson
dc.subjectPlath
dc.subjectRomantics
dc.subjectImagists
dc.subjectBrain
dc.subjectBody
dc.subjectDeath
dc.subjectRegeneration
dc.subjectCreation story
dc.titleHow the brain grew back its own history
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorT. R. Hummer
dc.description.committeeT. R. Hummer
dc.description.committeeSusan Rosenbaum
dc.description.committeeJed Rasula


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