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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Dianna Day
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T21:24:26Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T21:24:26Z
dc.date.issued2004-08
dc.identifier.otherjohnson_dianna_d_200408_edd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/johnson_dianna_d_200408_edd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/21860
dc.description.abstractBusiness education in Georgia has experienced a shortage of teachers for the past several years. Some relief was realized due to the decline in the economy; however, a threat exists of that shortage reemerging as the economy improves. The purpose of this study was to describe the job satisfaction of business education teachers in Georgia’s secondary public schools and determine the relationship between job satisfaction and intent to remain in the profession. The Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire was used to measure job satisfaction levels. A systematic random sampling method was used to select participants from a list provided by the State Department of Education of all business education teachers in Georgia. Survey packets were sent to a sample of 594 secondary business education teachers in Georgia’s public schools with a 49.3% rate of return (N=293). Dillman’s (2000) tailored design method was used as a guide for this study. This sample was predominately female (80%), married (78.6%), received their certification through a traditional route (73%), held a master’s degree, and were an average age of 43 years. Georgia’s secondary business education teachers e indicated a high level of general job satisfaction (78.63). Many (43.3%) indicated they plan to retire as soon as they have taught for 30 years. Over one-half (51.4%) intend to leave the profession within ten years. A Pearson correlation matrix indicated that there was a statistically significant relationship between general job satisfaction and salary. One-way ANOVAs comparing the intent to remain variable with the individual intrinsic and extrinsic MSQ scales indicated that the groups varied on the ability utilization, achievement, advancement, and responsibility intrinsic scales. Extrinsic scales indicating a statistically significant effect when compared with the intent to remain variable were company/school policies and practices and working conditions.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectJob Satisfaction
dc.subjectteacher retention
dc.subjectbusiness education teachers
dc.subjectMinnesoat Satisfaction Questionnaire
dc.subjectintent to remain
dc.titleJob satisfaction and intent to remain in teaching of Georgia business education teachers
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreeEdD
dc.description.departmentOccupational Studies
dc.description.majorOccupational Studies
dc.description.advisorWanda L. Stitt-Gohdes
dc.description.committeeWanda L. Stitt-Gohdes
dc.description.committeeHelen Hall
dc.description.committeeKaren Jones
dc.description.committeeJay Rojewski
dc.description.committeeMyra Womble


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