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dc.contributor.authorHernandez, Amy M
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T21:24:19Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T21:24:19Z
dc.date.issued2004-08
dc.identifier.otherhernandez_amy_m_200408_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hernandez_amy_m_200408_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/21853
dc.description.abstractSpanish and English have coexisted in many areas of the United States since its independence. English has influenced Spanish in many ways as a result of this contact producing a mixed code called Spanglish. Spanglish is spoken by bilingual speakers of both languages, and to other speakers of Spanglish. The idea that Spanglish has been growing in popularity and even in acceptability has both excited and frightened speakers of Spanish and English alike. This work explores the linguistic processes involved in Spanglish as well as discusses who speaks Spanglish and why. Ten bilingual speakers of Spanish and English living in Georgia were recorded to analyze their informal speech patterns. The features of Spanglish discussed are the lexical borrowings, morphological additions, and code switching. The instances of code switching were proven to be bound by syntactic rules which are also discussed.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectSpanglish
dc.subjectLanguage Contact
dc.subjectCode Switching
dc.subjectLexical Borrowings from English into Spanish
dc.titleSpanglish
dc.title.alternativea study of the features of bilingual speakers in Georgia
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentLinguistics
dc.description.majorLinguistics
dc.description.advisorMarlyse Baptista
dc.description.committeeMarlyse Baptista
dc.description.committeeSarah Blackwell
dc.description.committeeDiana Ranson


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