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dc.contributor.authorElder, India Bianca
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T21:23:31Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T21:23:31Z
dc.date.issued2004-08
dc.identifier.otherelder_india_b_200408_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/elder_india_b_200408_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/21814
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the appeal of realty crime TV, specifically The New Detectives: Case Studies in Forensic Science. An examination of the programming genres that preceded the show and how they collectively contribute to the creation of The New Detectives was conducted in order to provide an accurate description of the program and its most significant elements. This part of the research culminates from previous research and literature regarding film and television images and popular culture, the understanding of media messages, and the sociology of death in American society. An autoethnographic study yields first hand accounts of The New Detectives viewing experience. This historical research and ethnography contradict the common assumption that murder and death themes are in opposition to a viewer’s ability to experience pleasure and entertainment while watching such programming.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAutoethnography
dc.subjectDeath
dc.subjectMurder
dc.subjectReality television
dc.subjectRealism
dc.subjectVoyeurism
dc.titleDinner and a murder, anyone?
dc.title.alternativean exploration of reality crime in American prime time television
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentJournalism
dc.description.majorJournalism
dc.description.advisorNathaniel Kohn
dc.description.committeeNathaniel Kohn
dc.description.committeeDwight Brooks
dc.description.committeeJanice Hume


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