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dc.contributor.authorCovington, Eric fulton
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T21:23:08Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T21:23:08Z
dc.date.issued2004-08
dc.identifier.othercovington_eric_f_200408_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/covington_eric_f_200408_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/21793
dc.description.abstractNietzsche, using the metaphor of translation, sought to translate man back into nature in what he coined, “terms of life.” During the transcription process, he discovered that living is the will to power and nothing besides. Using this new understanding of life, he attempted to re-translate man’s quintessential attributes, knowledge and morality, into this new language of power. With his new and revised edition of the text of man, Nietzsche believed he had written the most thorough and accurate assessment of humanity yet offered. The idea of eternal recurrence stands as the last chapter in his new human text. Nietzsche thought that a willful expectation of an eternal recurrence of all events would be a complete spiritual affirmation of his newly discovered principle…the will to power. He further believed that such a grave idea could serve as an expedient to the resentment and nihilism plaguing Western morality and philosophy. Nietzsche, at last, dreamed that an individual or class of individuals would emerge, able to bare the thought of recurrence and serve as the founding archons to an apotheosized future.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightsOn Campus Only
dc.subjectNietzsche
dc.subjectTranslation
dc.subjectWill to Power
dc.subjectKnowledge
dc.subjectNihilism
dc.subjectResentment
dc.subjectAffirmation
dc.titleTranslating man
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentReligion
dc.description.majorReligion
dc.description.advisorWilliam L. Power
dc.description.committeeWilliam L. Power
dc.description.committeeDavid Williams
dc.description.committeeO. Bradley Bassler


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