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dc.contributor.authorStephens, John Allen
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T21:21:04Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T21:21:04Z
dc.date.issued2004-05
dc.identifier.otherstephens_john_a_200405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/stephens_john_a_200405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/21689
dc.description.abstractIn Friedrich Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy and Walter Benjamin’s “The Storyteller” the emergence of art is based on cultural traditions which are negated by modernizing forces. For Nietzsche these modernizing forces can be negated by the re-emergence of tragedy through the German spirit” that possesses the same capacity for aesthetic sensitivity and creativity as the Hellenic genius of Greek tragedy. For Benjamin however, modern culture is unable to utilize storytelling as a remedy for the modern world’s loss of meaning. Under Benjamin’s perspective historical realism, culture and social structure are both tied to particular historical moments, and the present is unable to recover past experiences. This thesis considers how Nietzsche and Benjamin assess the connection between art and culture, and how these philosophies of literature reflect different assessments of the possibilty of the rebirth of art.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectWalter Benjamin
dc.subjectFriedrich Nietzsche
dc.subjectThe Birth of Tragedy
dc.subjectThe Storyteller
dc.titlePhilosophies of literature in the works of Nietzsche and Benjamin
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentGerman
dc.description.majorGerman
dc.description.advisorBeatrice Hanssen
dc.description.committeeBeatrice Hanssen
dc.description.committeeChristine Haase
dc.description.committeeMax Reinhart


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