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dc.contributor.authorO'Keeffe, Anne Kathryn
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-03T21:19:43Z
dc.date.available2014-03-03T21:19:43Z
dc.date.issued2004-05
dc.identifier.otherokeeffe_anne_k_200405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/okeeffe_anne_k_200405_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/21621
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the ways in which Augustus became the “Father of His Country” in more than just title. Through the legislation passed under his administration and through his building program, Augustus portrayed himself as the father of all of the citizens of Rome. He fulfilled for the country the duties and obligations once relegated to the paterfamilias, including moral, monetary, and religious responsibilities. Augustus fulfilled all of these duties so that he could protect the upper class family unit. He also portrayed himself as the pious leader whose religious devotion would lead to divine protection and success for Rome. On monuments such as the Ara Pacis and the Forum of Augustus, his family was depicted as the torchbearers of the new generation of Roman leaders. Over the course of his reign, Augustus firmly established his image as pater patriae, the “Father of his Country.”
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAugustus
dc.subjectPater patriae
dc.subjectPaterfamilias
dc.subjectSumptuary Laws
dc.subjectLex Julia de maritandis ordinibus
dc.subjectLex Julia de adulteriis coercendis
dc.subjectAra Pacis
dc.subjectForum of Augustus
dc.subjectJulia
dc.subjectDomus Augusta
dc.titleAugustus as paterfamilias
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentClassical Languages
dc.description.majorLatin
dc.description.advisorRobert Curtis
dc.description.committeeRobert Curtis
dc.description.committeeRichard LaFleur
dc.description.committeeKeith Dix


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